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nokiabae:

"WHITEWASH" a Documentary On The Black Experience In Surfing

Whitewash explores the African-American experience and race in surfing. It touches on some pertinent issues about how the history of surfing was detached from it’s indigenous Hawaiian origins and largely regarded as having it’s founding or “discovery” with European settlers. It also focuses on the issues of segregation and racism at beaches in California and of how the belief that “black people can’t swim” was passed down from generation to generation. 

I’m so glad this documentary exists. There is also great evidence of sea culture in West Africa which after the slave trade forced the people to move inland. Surfing has never been a white-trait. 

hiphopeducation:

BORN IN THE BRONX: AN EXHIBITION OF ARTIFACTS FROM THE CORNELL HIP HOP COLLECTION

Open June 26 - July 26 

620 Greenwich Street at the corner of Leroy Street

In 2007, the Cornell Hip Hop Collection was established by Johan Kugelberg. In the years since, the Cornell Hip Hop Collection has grown to be the largest archive of hip hop materials in the world, spanning over four decades and over 200,000 objects.

Last summer,
Boo-Hooray and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise held an open archiving of Afrika Bambaataa’s record collection prior to its delivery to Cornell University.

This summer, we’re staging an exhibition of the most amazing items we identified alongside highlights from the Cornell archive including:

  • Hand-written lyrics by Afrika Bambaataa.
  • Original records from Bambaataa’s collection.
  • Artworks and hand-painted hip hop clothing by Buddy Esquire, the king of the flyer.
  • Original animation and photography from Charlie Ahearn’s Wild Style.
  • Iconic photographs by Joe Conzo, the man who the New York Times said “took hip hop’s baby pictures.”
  • A sound-installation of rare live early hip hop performances from Breakbeat Lenny Roberts’ collection.

SURPRISE GUESTS will be DJing. Join Boo-Hooray/Gavin Brown’s Enterprise on social media to keep posted on who and when.

Several crates of Afrika Bambaataa’s duplicate records from his personal collection will be for sale on a first-come-first-serve basis. These records are stickered as coming from Bambaataa’s stash.

An exclusive signed silkscreen print portrait of Afrika Bambaataa by Paul Insect in a numbered edition of 150 will be available for sale on a first-come-first-serve basis.

More information, visit
boo-hooray.com.

so-treu:

strugglingtobeheard:

elegantly-tasteless:

miaadamswhat:

geejayeff:

scandal-whipped:

Detroit activist slams reporter on air for misreporting reasons for water shutoff to thousands

OMG you all have to watch this.

She’s my HERO!

DAYUM! She shut that FOX-reporter-wannabe down. Not here for that mess at all!

Bloop

I’m tryna be her when I grow up

She dismissed the news team like bye I’m done with you. Wow. What lies, bless her!!!!!!

YES mama. YES.

allerasphinx asked:

did you watch the comic con vid? i like natalie dormer and all, but she totally white-feministed that question the moderator asked the panel.

acceber74:

allerasphinx:

thisislucreziasand:

she totally did. like without even remotely a doubt.

i was listening to her speak and i’m just like…what a fucking luxury to be able to talk about things like weight and boobs——i swear nicole was going somewhere with her “ass-size” comment but she got cut off. the treatment and sexualization of black women’s bodies is VERY different.

natalie, as a white women, can sit down and talk about how “unhealthy” body image is in magazines—-blah blah blah but like what about RACE and REPRESENTATION? what about the women who ARENT seeing themselves in magazines? white actors ALWAYS ignore race and colorism when it comes to the body image issue in hollywood. 

like, i’m sorry u have to be skinny but at least u’re white…? does that sound cruel? i mean whiteness opens all sorts of doors that r forever shut to actors like nicole—-regardless of talent. 

i remember a hollywood roundtable where all these white actors were talking about why they didnt get roles (too fat, boobs not big enough) and i think it was regina king who made a statement that basically amounted to the reason why she didn’t get a role was because she was black. and everyone got quiet, lol. cause i mean oop u gotta lose weight? cant eat that cake? how about someone basically asking u to change the color of ur skin or the shape of ur eyes? how about that?

i dunno…natalie isn’t the first white actor to be ignorant at panels. i keep thinking about that guy from spartacus complaining about having to go tanning and wear bronzers and manu bennet just calling him out like the reason why he’s the lead is because of that. rinse and repeat with mindy kaling and the ignorant shit said to her when she talked about diversity at her roundtable. or how about EVERY hollywood roundtable where white actors get to sit around look wide-eyed and innocent while their colleagues of color talk about the lack of new projects they’re getting and the racism in the industry. those white actors and directors who listen to these statements with varying degrees of silence or open-mouthed silencing techniques.

one of these days i want somebody to stand up during one of these panels and read these white actors for filth. i aint got no problems with natalie dormer but this kind of speaking that normalizes white women and others non-white women needs to stop. at some point SOMEONE needs to acknowledge the european standards of beauty. i THOUGHT natalie was going in that direction with her whole “french films” business but it was more bullshit “oh we get to see different shapes of ppl” BUT WHITE PPL NATALIE, U GET TO SEE MORE WHITE PPL!

It really comes off as uber pretentious when people start speaking about “European films” as if they don’t have issues with representation as well.

I listened to her and she basically said nothing that hasn’t been said…like Natalie needs to understand there’s a reason why she’s on the Tudors, Elementary, Game of Thrones, in the Hunger Games as an actress who’s only claim to fame prior to that was playing the jump off for the coke addicted attorney in Silk. That she, as a white English woman, can get roles that a black American actress can’t even dream of.

So, yeah….when they talk about weight, boobs, and ass and lack thereof as a hindrance, I roll my eyes. All those superficial things can be changed if they choose. Kerry Washington made an excellent point when she did The Hollywood Reporter’s roundtable for TV actresses in the run up to the 2013 Emmys. All the women talking about having to lose weight, and she had to contend with being told she’s “too ethnic”, “the production was not ‘going black’, and she told them they could lose the weight, but she couldn’t change her skin color, nor does she want to. And then, nothing but blank stares and crickets.

This is one of the things I mean when I talk about ignorance or unconscious bias, and how the absence of malice does not mean something is inoffensive.

Is the point Natalie Dormer made valid? Yes. Is it in any way complete and/or representative of the bias and institutional misogyny, particularly racist misogyny? No.

And that is a problem.

So, yanno: things to think about.

pricklybangbang:

today at work i asked a customer if he wanted french vanilla creamer with his coffee and he said no because he wanted the “heterosexual” creamer instead and it just blows my mind that straight people say shit about how queer people “force our sexuality on them” because i have never met a single queer person who has done something like assign a sexuality to coffee creamer

LolWHUT?

(Source: supremecute)

femmenace-t:

pervocracy:

postwhitesociety:

hm

I think the “women are mysterious” thing can also come from:

1) Women actually being quite clear, but not telling men what they want to hear.  ”She said she doesn’t want to talk to me?  So many mixed messages and confusing signals!”

2) Women not having cheat codes.  ”I tried being nice, and she didn’t have sex with me.  I tried being an asshole, and she didn’t have sex with me.  Come on, there’s got to be some kind of solution to this puzzle!”

3) Women not being a hive mind.  ”First a woman told me that she likes guys with big muscles.  Then the very next day a woman told me she thinks muscles aren’t attractive at all.  Make up your mind, women!”

4) An individual woman doing something confusing, and instead of asking “why is she doing this now?” men ask “why do women always do this?”

Always reblog

(Source: ethiopienne)

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Do you ever think you'll stop drawing fanart? No offense it just seems like the kind of thing you're supposed to grow out of. I'm just curious what your plans/goals are since it isn't exactly an art form that people take seriously.

corpsereviver2:

talesfromthemek:

linzeestyle:

euclase:

Ah, fanart. Also known as the art that girls make.

Sad, immature girls no one takes seriously. Girls who are taught that it’s shameful to be excited or passionate about anything, that it’s pathetic to gush about what attracts them, that it’s wrong to be a geek, that they should feel embarrassed about having a crush, that they’re not allowed to gaze or stare or wish or desire. Girls who need to grow out of it.

That’s the art you mean, right?

Because in my experience, when grown men make it, nobody calls it fanart. They just call it art. And everyone takes it very seriously.

It’s interesting though — the culture of shame surrounding adult women and fandom. Even within fandom it’s heavily internalized: unsurprisingly, mind, given that fandom is largely comprised by young girls and, unfortunately, our culture runs on ensuring young girls internalize *all* messages no matter how toxic. But here’s another way of thinking about it.

Sports is a fandom. It requires zealous attention to “seasons,” knowledge of details considered obscure to those not involved in that fandom, unbelievable amounts of merchandise, and even “fanfic” in the form of fantasy teams. But this is a masculine-coded fandom. And as such, it’s encouraged - built into our economy! Have you *seen* Dish network’s “ultimate fan” advertisements, which literally base selling of a product around the normalization of all consuming (male) obsession? Or the very existence of sports bars, built around the link between fans and community enjoyment and analysis. Sport fandom is so ingrained in our culture that major events are treated like holidays (my gym closes for the Super Bowl) — and can you imagine being laughed at for admitting you didn’t know the difference between Supernatural and The X Files the way you might if you admit you don’t know the rules of football vs baseball, or basketball?

"Fandom" is not childish but we live in a culture that commodified women’s time in such away that their hobbies have to be "frivolous," because "mature" women’s interests are supposed to be marriage, family, and overall care taking: things that allow others to continue their own special interests, while leaving women without a space of their own.

So think about what you’re actually saying when you call someone “too old” for fandom. Because you’re suggesting they are “too old” for a consuming hobby, and I challenge you to answer — what do you think they should be doing instead?

Yup.

Imagine the looks I’d get if I showed up at work:
-on the day of my show’s season premier put a flag and magnetic stickers on my car with a show logo or symbol
- wore a show T-shirt & left early so I could BBQ and drink beer before show time
- brought around a magazine with my characters on the cover & bragged about how they were the best
- announced after work drinks at a fan-bar where all my shows were on screens & even the wait staff wore fandom jerseys

I only get this at cons. Sports fans get it in RL.

Boom.

fuckyeahfamousblackgirls:

Unlike the beautiful 6-year old Jonbenett Ramsey who received coverage all over the media - every tabloid, newspaper, news channel, talk show, 7-year old Aiyana Stanley was killed by a police officer during a raid while she was sleep and her murder received very little coverage.

Police, searching for a murder suspect, threw a flash grenade through the window of her family’s apartment around midnight. According to Aiyana’s father, it landed on the couch, setting Aiyana on fire. A police officer’s gun then went off, and shot Aiyana in the neck.

Aiyana was asleep on the living room sofa in her family’s apartment when Detroit police, searching for a homicide suspect, burst in and an officer’s gun went off, fatally striking the girl in the neck, family members said.

Her father, 25-year-old Charles Jones, told The Detroit News he had just gone to bed early Sunday after covering his daughter with her favorite blanket when he heard a flash grenade followed by a gunshot. When he rushed into the living room, he said, police forced him to lie on the ground, with his face in his daughter’s blood.

“I’ll never be the same. That’s my only daughter,” Jones told.

We haven’t forgotten about you baby. R.I.P.

fuck-me-barnes:

venneh:

randomstupidchaos:

wheelr:

MAN & PUDDING: ANTHONY MACKIE & BUTTERFLY CUPCAKES

Recipes: ColesButter Hearts SugarWholesome SweetenersNineMSNTaste AU 

I don’t even care about the logic behind this post. It is a gift from the universe.

Went to their blog, they have a whole series of stuff like this. INSTANT FOLLOW.

VERY RELEVANT TO MY INTERESTS WOULD RECOMMEND A++

I did not know I needed this.

beingruth:

misandry-mermaid:

noirbettie:

x0202:

just to be clear - a woman who created a hashtag meant to convey the message “no, not all may be sexual aggressors but yes, all women have experienced sexism to some degree” shut down her account after repeated harassment. she wasn’t generalizing men. she wasn’t making broad, sweeping statements that people claim are the problem with women’s movements. she was only opening a conversation centered around personal stories. what is anyone supposed to take from this except that many people are simply not interested in hearing these stories at all, as sugarcoated as they may be, as tactfully they may be put? not without redirecting the conversation to focus away from women, at any rate.

Are you fucking kidding me? I hate everyone.

This one goes out to all those people who say that if feminists were just nicer to men, catered to their feelings and didn’t pinpoint them as aggressors, we’d be taken seriously and our voices would be heard. BULLSHIT

Since I follow her, I want to put out there that this isn’t accurate, though she did temporarily (3 weeks?) make her account private and take some time off tweeting (a couple days, maybe a week?) to regroup.

She’s never deleted it or even changed her name. I think she’s remarkably brave for that.

That said, she did make her account private for that time and the fact that she had to do so and step away and didn’t feel comfortable telling her mother about it until things had quieted down (she’s still in college)…these all point to how very messed up it was.

Everything I’m sharing is something she’s publicly tweeted after unlocking her account again.

[…] If Snowpiercer had merely told the tale of an oppressed working class rising up to seize power from an evil overlord, it would already have been an improvement over most of the political messages in mainstream cinema. There are all sorts of nice touches in its portrayal of a declining capitalism that can maintain its ideological legitimacy even when it literally has no more bullets in its guns.

But the story Bong tells goes beyond that. It’s about the limitations of a revolution which merely takes over the existing social machinery rather than attempting to transcend it. And it’s all the more effective because the heart of that critique comes as a late surprise, from a character we might not expect.

[…] All too often, explicitly political art fails as both art and politics. Socialists shouldn’t put up with half-assed imitations of popular genres, nor with political messages denuded of anything but the lowest common denominator.

What makes Snowpiercer satisfying is that it commits neither error. It’s an engrossing and stylish movie, and its underlying themes go beyond merely pointing out class exploitation to challenge the logic of capital. It’s a movie that should be seen as widely as possible, if only so that Bong Joon-ho gets more chances to make movies for English-speaking audiences that badly need them.

Smash the Engine by Peter Frase | Jacobin Magazine (via filmantidote)

wolvensnothere minim-calibre ittybittymanatee this is brilliant.

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